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The Reign of Recycling October 5, 2015

Posted by tkcollier in Enviroment, In The News, Lifestyle.
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According to the E.P.A.’s estimates, virtually all the greenhouse benefits — more than 90 percent — come from just a few materials: paper, cardboard and metals like the aluminum in soda cans.
Once you exclude paper products and metals, the total annual savings in the United States from recycling everything else in municipal trash — plastics, glass, food, yard trimmings, textiles, rubber, leather — is only two-tenths of 1 percent of America’s carbon footprint.

As a business, recycling is on the wrong side of two long-term global economic trends. For centuries, the real cost of labor has been increasing while the real cost of raw materials has been declining. That’s why we can afford to buy so much more stuff than our ancestors could. As a labor-intensive activity, recycling is an increasingly expensive way to produce materials that are less and less valuable.

It would be much simpler and more effective to impose the equivalent of a carbon tax on garbage, as Thomas C. Kinnaman has proposed after conducting what is probably the most thorough comparison of the social costs of recycling, landfilling and incineration.

The Reign of Recycling http://nyti.ms/1iUpbBE

The Difference Between the Israeli and Greek Wailing Wall October 8, 2011

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Humor, In The News.
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Wailing Wall in Israel

Greek Wailing Wall

E-Trade Baby Hit By the Market August 13, 2011

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Humor, Video.
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Sorry, Bud: Natty Light Isn’t Just for College Anymore July 28, 2009

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Food, Humor.
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beer-before-bedHeineken sales sank 18% from the previous year in grocery, convenience and drug stores during the two-week period ended July 5, followed by Budweiser at 14%. Corona Extra sales dropped 11%, while Miller Lite declined 9% and Bud Light fell 7%. Coors Light sales held up better, falling less than 1% from a year ago.

Meanwhile, sales of “subpremium” beers including Busch, Natural Light and Keystone posted “substantial gains”, according to Ad Age, which didn’t provide the specifics.

via Sorry, Bud: Natty Light Isn’t Just for College Anymore – Real Time Economics – WSJ.

What Are Those “Toxic Assests” Worth? February 27, 2009

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business.
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From late 2005 to the middle of 2007, around $450bn of CDO of ABS were issued, of which about one third were created from risky mortgage-backed bonds (known as mezzanine CDO of ABS) and much of the rest from safer tranches (high grade CDO of ABS.)

Out of that pile, around $305bn of the CDOs are now in a formal state of default, with the CDOs underwritten by Merrill Lynch accounting for the biggest pile of defaulted assets, followed by UBS and Citi.

The real shocker, though, is what has happened after those defaults. JPMorgan estimates that $102bn of CDOs has already been liquidated. The average recovery rate for super-senior tranches of debt – or the stuff that was supposed to be so ultra safe that it always carried a triple A tag – has been 32 per cent for the high grade CDOs. With mezzanine CDO’s, though, recovery rates on those AAA assets have been a mere 5 per cent.

via FT.com / Markets / Insight – Insight: Time to expose those CDOs.

Should We Turn Japanese? February 14, 2009

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Geopolitics.
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“I thought America had studied Japan’s failures,” said Hirofumi Gomi, a top official at Japan’s Financial Services Agency during the crisis. “Why is it making the same mistakes?”

Japan’s problems did not happen at the time of a world-wide downturn. I think that Geithner is afraid that the World Financial System couldn’t handle the Japanese cure right now – The cure could kill the patient.

via Lessons From Japan in Stemming a Crisis – NYTimes.com.

No Jobs = No Peace February 14, 2009

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Geopolitics.
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Just last week, the new United States director of national intelligence, Dennis C. Blair, told Congress that instability caused by the global economic crisis had become the biggest security threat facing the United States, outpacing terrorism.

High unemployment rates, especially among young workers, have led to protests in countries as varied as Latvia, Chile, Greece, Bulgaria and Iceland and contributed to strikes in Britain and France.

Worldwide job losses from the recession that started in the United States in December 2007 could hit a staggering 50 million by the end of 2009, according to the International Labor Organization, a United Nations agency. The slowdown has already claimed 3.6 million American jobs.

via Rise in Jobless Poses Threat to Stability Worldwide – NYTimes.com.

Monetary Warfare December 31, 2008

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Geopolitics.
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What are the threats that could make the U.S. economy look less like America and more like Zimbabwe? He sees them everywhere – in the Chinese ownership of vast amounts of American debt, in Russia’s increased centralization of its economy, in Al Qaeda’s long-established fascination with damaging the U.S. economy.

Four of the scenarios keep him up at night (more…)

The 5 Mistakes That are Costing Us Dearly Now December 10, 2008

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business.
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There will come a moment when the most urgent threats posed by the credit crisis have eased and the larger task before us will be to chart a direction for the economic steps ahead. This will be a dangerous moment. Behind the debates over future policy is a debate over history—a debate over the causes of our current situation. The battle for the past will determine the battle for the present. So it’s crucial to get the history straight.

What were the critical decisions that led to the crisis? Mistakes were made at every fork in the road—we had what engineers call a “system failure,” when not a single decision but a cascade of decisions produce a tragic result. Let’s look at five key moments.

via Joseph E. Stiglitz on capitalist fools: About Us: vanityfair.com.

See the Economy November 6, 2008

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business.
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What most of the doom-and-gloom reports on our economy don’t provide is perspective—a historical survey of an economy that’s been through more than a few ups and downs in its day. Here’s a farsighted view of how our temperamental economic machine works, and a close-up of how it stands today. This chart is a great time-line of recent economic history. Click to enlarge. economydiagram

via GOOD » GOOD Sheet: It’s the Economy, Stupid!»

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