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Some corals like it hot: Heat stress may help coral reefs survive climate change March 31, 2012

Posted by tkcollier in Enviroment, In The News.
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“Until recently, it was widely assumed that coral would bleach and die off worldwide as the oceans warm due to climate change,” says lead author Jessica Carilli, a post-doctoral fellow in Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation’s (ANSTO) Institute for Environmental Research. “This would have very serious consequences, as loss of live coral — already observed in parts of the world — directly reduces fish habitats and the shoreline protection reefs provide from storms.”

“Even through the warming of our oceans is already occurring, these findings give hope that coral that has previously withstood anomalously warm water events may do so again,” says Carilli. “While more research is needed, this appears to be good news for the future of coral reefs in a warming climate.”

via Some corals like it hot: Heat stress may help coral reefs survive climate change.

Boomer or Bust – The War Against Youth March 30, 2012

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Lifestyle, Politics.
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The recession didn’t gut the prospects of American young people. The Baby Boomers took care of that.

David Frum, former George W. Bush speechwriter, had the guts to acknowledge that the Tea Party’s combination of expensive entitlement programs and tax cuts is something entirely different from a traditional political program: “This isn’t conservatism: It’s a going-out-of-business sale for the Baby Boom generation.”

The impasse of the moment is, tragically, the result of the best aspects of the Boomers’ spirit. The native optimism that emerged out of the explosively creative postwar world led them to believe that growth would go on forever; that peace and prosperity were the natural state of things. Their good intentions seem like willful naivete today, but the intentions were genuine. Clinton actually believed that globalization would export the First World rather than bring the Third World home; it did both.

via Young People in the Recession – The War Against Youth – Esquire.

Chart of Recoverable Energy Resources By Country. Guess Who is Numeo Uno? March 22, 2012

Posted by tkcollier in Enviroment, Geopolitics.
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Blind Fold Rubik`s Cube Record March 18, 2012

Posted by tkcollier in cool stuff, Lifestyle, Video.
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Vodpod videos no longer available.

Blind Fold Rubik`s Cube Record – Funny Videos a…, posted with vodpod
Marcell Endrey sets a new world record after solving a Rubik`s Cube blindfolded in just 28.80 seconds

1% Getting Richer In European Welfare States Too March 9, 2012

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Lifestyle.
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As the chart from the Roine and Waldenström study shows, the share of income for the top 1% in these seven countries generally follows the same trend line. That means domestic policy can’t be the principal reason for the current spread between high earners and others. Since the 1980s, that spread has increased in nearly all seven countries. The U.S. and Sweden, countries with very different systems of redistribution, along with the U.K. and Canada show the largest increase in the share of income for the top 1%.

The main reasons for these increases are not hard to find. Adding a few hundred million Chinese and Indians to the world’s productive labor force after 1980 slowed the rise in income for workers all over the developed world. That’s the most important factor at work. The top 1% gain relatively because they are less affected by the hordes of newly productive workers.

But the top 1% have another advantage. Many of them have unique skills that are difficult to replicate. Our top earners include entrepreneurs, rock stars, professional athletes, surgeons and lawyers. Also included are the managers of large international corporations and, yes, bankers and financiers

via Allan Meltzer: A Look at the Global One Percent – WSJ.com.

People Aren’t Smart Enough for Democracy to Flourish, Scientists Say March 5, 2012

Posted by tkcollier in Lifestyle, Politics.
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The research, led by David Dunning, a psychologist at Cornell University, shows that incompetent people are inherently unable to judge the competence of other people, or the quality of those people’s ideas. For example, if people lack expertise on tax reform, it is very difficult for them to identify the candidates who are actual experts. They simply lack the mental tools needed to make meaningful judgments.

As a result, no amount of information or facts about political candidates can override the inherent inability of many voters to accurately evaluate them. On top of that, “very smart ideas are going to be hard for people to adopt, because most people don’t have the sophistication to recognize how good an idea is,” Dunning told Life’s Little Mysteries. (more…)

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