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Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Neighborhood Income and rent maps of U.S. cities February 18, 2013

Posted by tkcollier in Economy & Business, Lifestyle, Web Site.
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mrmoneybagsRich Blocks, Poor Blocks is an interactive map (created by Christopher Persaud, a data reporter for a bank website) showing the average income for every neighborhood in America. Type in your address, press search, and there you have it: Your city, shaded by income, according to data from an annual survey conducted by the Census Bureau. The greenest blocks–Census blocks, that is, not city blocks–signify the richest areas, typically bringing in an average household income of $100,000 or more a year. The reddest blocks are the poorest, with annual income somewhere around $20,000. All the rest get some shade of red or green, depending where they fall.

Rich Blocks, Poor Blocks | Neighborhood income and rent maps of U.S. cities.

Get Your Education For Free On YouTube April 9, 2011

Posted by tkcollier in Lifestyle, Video, Web Site.
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Watch. Practice. Learn almost anything—for free.

What started out as Sal making a few algebra videos for his cousins has grown to over 2,100 videos and 100 self-paced exercises and assessments covering everything from arithmetic to physics, finance, and history.

via Khan Academy.

Who Is Behind SNOPES? April 5, 2010

Posted by tkcollier in Cool Sites, Web Site.
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David and Barbara Mikkelson are among those trying to clean the cesspool. The unassuming California couple run Snopes, one of the most popular fact-checking destinations on the Web. After 14 years, they seem to have concluded that people are rather cavalier about the facts. “Rumors are a great source of comfort for people,” Mrs. Mikkelson said.

The enduring articles are the ones about everyday fears: computer viruses, scams, missing children. Some e-mail chain letters, like the one offering users $245 for forwarding the message, never fade away.

“People keep falling for the same kind of things over and over again,” Mr. Mikkelson said. Some readers always seem to think, for instance, that the government is trying to poison them: Mrs. Mikkelson said rumors about AIDS have been recycled into rumors about swine flu vaccines.

For the Mikkelsons, the site affirms what cultural critics have bemoaned for years: the rejection of nuance and facts that run contrary to one’s point of view. “Especially in politics, most everything has infinite shades of gray to it, but people just want things to be true or false,” Mr. Mikkelson said. “In the larger sense, it’s people wanting confirmation of their world view.”

In a given week, Snopes tries to set the record straight on everything from political smears to old wives’ tales. No, Kenya did not erect a sign welcoming people to the “birthplace of Barack Obama.” No, Wal-Mart did not authorize illegal immigration raids at its stores. No, the Olive Garden restaurant chain did not hand out $500 gift cards to online fans.

via At Snopes, a Quest to Debunk Misinformation Online – NYTimes.com. (more…)

World Clock October 22, 2007

Posted by tkcollier in cool stuff, Economy & Business, Enviroment, Geopolitics, Lifestyle, Web Site.
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World Clock

Just as the Chris Jordan photos, a few posts below, help you visualize the immensity of events, this clock gives you a perspective on the speed of events – from birth, divorce, disease, oil pumped to death – the numbers just keep ticking away. Thanks to Randy, who is beyond space & time.

Images of US Consumption October 19, 2007

Posted by tkcollier in Art, Cool photos, Economy & Business, Enviroment, Lifestyle, Photography, Web Site.
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chris jordan photography

This new series looks at contemporary American culture through the austere lens of statistics. Each image portrays a specific quantity of something: fifteen million sheets of office paper (five minutes of paper use); 106,000 aluminum cans (thirty seconds of can consumption) and so on. My hope is that images representing these quantities might have a different effect than the raw numbers alone, such as we find daily in articles and books. Statistics can feel abstract and anesthetizing, making it difficult to connect with and make meaning of 3.6 million SUV sales in one year, for example, or 2.3 million Americans in prison, or 426,000 cell phones retired every day. This project visually examines these vast and bizarre measures of our society, in large intricately detailed prints assembled from thousands of smaller photographs. This image if from 106,000 aluminum cans, the quantity discarded in the US every 30 seconds!

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