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A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE April 5, 2007

Posted by tkcollier in Enviroment, Life, Science & Technology.
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Edge: A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE By Steven Pinker
This doctrine, “the idea that humans are peaceable by nature and corrupted by modern institutions—pops up frequently in the writing of public intellectuals like José Ortega y Gasset (“War is not an instinct but an invention”), Stephen Jay Gould (“Homo sapiens is not an evil or destructive species”), and Ashley Montagu (“Biological studies lend support to the ethic of universal brotherhood”),” he writes. “But, now that social scientists have started to count bodies in different historical periods, they have discovered that the romantic theory gets it backward: Far from causing us to become more violent, something in modernity and its cultural institutions has made us nobler.” As an example:

From Wikipedia

Cat burning was a form of zoosadistic entertainment in 16th century Paris, France. In this form of entertainment, people would gather dozens of cats in a net, hoist them high into the air from a special bundle onto a bonfire. According to Norman Davies[1], the assembled spectators “shrieked with laughter as the animals, howling with pain, were singed, roasted, and finally carbonized.”[1]

“[I]t was the custom to burn a basket, barrel, or sack full of live cats, which was hung from a tall mast in the midst of the bonfire; sometimes a fox was burned. The people collected the embers and ashes of the fire and took them home, believing that they brought good luck. The French kings often witnessed these spectacles and even lit the bonfire with their own hands. In 1648 Louis the Fourteenth, crowned with a wreath of roses and carrying a bunch of roses in his hand, kindled the fire, danced at it and partook of the banquet afterwards in the town hall. But this was the last occasion when a monarch presided at the midsummer bonfire in Paris. At Metz midsummer fires were lighted with great pomp on the esplanade, and a dozen cats, enclosed in wicker cages, were burned alive in them, to the amusement of the people. Similarly at Gap, in the department of the Hautes-Alpes, cats used to be roasted over the midsummer bonfire.”[2]

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1. LiveLeak.com - Redefining the Media « Terryorisms - April 6, 2007

[…] Or 16th Century French sport of Cat Burning  […]


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